I liked this brief blogpost by Chris Dillow, which points out that the G20 hoo-hah shows how newspapers in the UK

believe the fate of the economy hangs upon the actions of policy-makers, but are ignoring evidence of whether it might recover anyway

Chris puts forward a few ideas as to why this is – availability bias, leadership illusion, and glamour bias. All these are very plausible reasons.

The one I’d add to the list is “narrative bias” – the fact that newspapers favour reportage that creates narratives over items that are factual. The strong narrative line is that we’re in a uniformly disastrous situation, and the PM, or Obama, or whoever, can personally shift the global economy for good or ill. The weak narrative line – as ever – is that it’s very complicated and hard to read the signs.

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Written by Anthony Zacharzewski

Anthony Zacharzewski was one of the founders of Demsoc in 2006. Before starting work for Demsoc in 2010, he was a Whitehall civil servant and a local government officer.

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    […] The fundamental media bias | The Democratic Society – " “narrative bias” – the fact that newspapers favour reportage that create narratives over stories that are factual. The strong narrative line is that we’re in a uniformly disastrous situation, and the PM, or Obama, or whoever, can personally shift the global economy for good or ill. The weak narrative line – as ever – is that it’s very complicated and hard to read the signs " […]