Here are the articles and web pages the Talk Issues team recommend today:

  • Balls’ EU immigration claims don’t stand up – Sarah Mulley at Left Foot Forward takes a look at the immigration stance of Labour leader candidate Ed Balls. Balls is conflating immigration with intra-EU migration, which has been pointed out elsewhere. She accuses Balls and other Labour leader candidates of fighting yesterday's battles. "There is also a risk that Balls, and other leadership candidates, are fighting yesterday’s battles on EU immigration. Migration flows from A8 countries have proved to be short-lived. The latest statistics show that the UK is now experiencing net emigration to these countries for the first time since 2004 – more A8 migrants are leaving the UK than are arriving."
  • Emigration & wages – Chris Dillow challenges the call of Labour's Ed Balls to restrict intra-EU migration. Dillow highlights a study looking at the impact of migration on Lithuania, and he says: "Balls’ demand for immigration controls – which are, of course, emigration controls too – amounts to an attack upon the living standards of poor workers."
  • My once-in-a-generation cut? The armed forces. All of them – Simon Jenkins argues that Britain doesn't need to spend £45 billion a year defending itself from a post-Cold War "fantasy proposition, that some unspecified but potent "enemy" lurked in the seas and skies around Britain".
  • Co-operatives, Consultations and Lambeth – Shane Carmichael, a Lambeth resident, considers the council's plans for mutual services, and how consultation and engagement will be handled.
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Here are the articles and web pages the Talk Issues team recommend today:

  • Heffer on the EU: Nostradamus he ain’t – One of our own pieces on a hysterical prediction of the future by Simon Heffer, written in 2003. Find out about the gangs of armed EU police who will be roaming the streets attacking the middle classes in (gasp!) 2010
  • Spending cuts – now you’re talking – Following the Chancellor’s announcement on spending cuts consultation, Matthew Taylor – the man behind the Big Conversation – passes on some lessons from that experience
  • Football and Twitter – When Saturday Comes considers the impact that the use of Twitter has had on football journalism. The use of Twitter to “take the temperature” of a team’s fans has interesting parallels with the political world – and in both cases, you have to wonder about how representative the sample is.
  • Financial Re-Regulation and Democracy – Joseph Stiglitz writes in New Europe on what the bank rescue, bank regulation and the move to spending cuts say about the state of our democracies.
Posted in Uncategorized.